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A Farewell………

A Farewell………

“It was all a dream, I used to read Word Up! Magazine,

Salt-n-Pepa and Heavy D up in the limousine,

Hangin’ pictures on my wall,

Every Saturday Rap Attack, Mr. Magic, Marley Marl”

 

Growing up in Cork, access to Word Up! Magazine was likely slack, if even nonexistent. Salt-n-Pepa were the condiments you had in the middle of the table, and the closest we came to Heavy D was the suger laced, citric goodness of a bottle of Sunny D. While Mr. Smalls had his musical influences, I had automotive ones. I would spend hours, likely better spent studying for the Junior Cert or whatever, browsing car sites, soaking up knowledge of suspension mods, lap times and historic championships. The photos always drew me in further, telling the story in the most visual medium possible. I covered my walls in center fold pull outs of Escorts, Fiestas, Silvia’s and Corollas, and my computer hard drive was full of saved pictures of drifting, rallying, shows and builds. One of my daily check ins was always FreshFix.

It was almost a muscle memory at one point. Turn on Computer. Check Fresh Fix, Autolifers, OMGDrift, Speedhunters and RallyForums. Read every article that was new since the last visit. Save images. That was what I was into, but something I never envisioned becoming a part of. Later, I began to take a few pictures after buying a DSLR on a whim, I had really wanted to buy a Racing Wheel for the Playstation with the money from a first summer job. When Harvey Norman didn’t have the Logitech that I wanted, and me being 18 with the first real lump of self-earned cash, a reduced Nikon caught my eye and lit a bug. That camera would die a death at the hands of a spilled beer bottle in the middle of Worthersee in 2015 but taking pictures of cars had started to become something I enjoyed, even though looking back my Lightroom skills were ‘questionable’.

I’ve always been my own harshest critic, and truly the amount of times I’ve questioned everything about my own work is incredible in a way nobody ever knows, but over time I got gradually braver in how to share my photos. I started a Facebook page, not to promote myself, but rather as a thought to friends who I felt I was clogging their Facebook feed with silly racing images. Things grew slowly, mainly as I started to improve in areas and try new things with each passing opportunity. I went back to my old habits of reading websites and studying pictures. Find people that are top notch, study their photos and try and decipher just how the shot is captured.

In December 2016 I saw a post on FB. FreshFix was relaunching. It excited me as it was a returning part of what had got me into cars in the first place. In a moment of madness, I sent an awkward email to the site, simply introducing myself and asked if, yano, you’re really stuck, and its ok if you’re not, would you sorta be interested in a few of my photos on the site. It really was that bad. I’d sent a similar mail to another site around the same time and got no reply, so confidence was low. Twenty Four months later, a lot of articles, countless words (some clearly written with the occasional alcoholic enablement if truth be known) and god knows how many images, here we are.

Marty & Rob, the real FreshFix team, saw something in me that I never saw myself. I knew how to sorta photograph cars, and I could babble on verbally for days, but they helped so much in ironing out the two to become a less crinkled end product than before. The very first article on the revamped site bore my name and I was giddy with the excitement for days before the launch. Shot in an industrial estate in Galway, that Nissan shoot is still one of my fondest. As a behind the scene scoop, that was the second car shot that day, at a time when my productivity was really at a high point. I had actually never photographed a single car as a feature until a few months previously, when Maurice Malone coaxed me into a series he was working on for CompleteCar at the time. Maurice is a Journalistic tour-de-force, an incredible wordsmith (and now also quite annoyed with my praise!) who is at the top of the game right now in Ireland, and those Irish Icons articles were a huge launchpad. The Silvia was shot for that series, alongside a Lancia Delta Integrale the same day, but the Nissan became a FreshFix feature car instead.

Nissan S14 Kouki JDM

The nature of my widespread interest in all things automotive hopefully came across in the articles shared, covering such a broad base that some sites have teams working on to cover. I gave you Rallying, from the WRC pinnacle to the grassroots local events, Drifting, Track Racing, Stance Shows and Motorcycle Road racing. Feature cars were 4WD, FWD and RWD. I enjoy just being around cars, and that what I always just wanted to share here on the site.

Over time, I became a sole contributor to the site. It felt like a personal blog, but I was determined to keep the site ticking over. The articles on these pages helped me get work out there on other sites and Magazines, but the regularity of maintaining the site just got too slack on my side due to work commitments.

At the end of December, the FreshFix.ie domain will cease and the great times we had on the site will filter off into cyber space, hopefully remembered fondly. Rob King is the man behind the incredibly good Trackdays.ie sessions in Mondello, and the growth they have seen over the last two years is testament to the great work being done. With Sell out notices on nearly every event this year, and the ever-expanding fleet of Trackdays vehicles in the pipeline, all looks good. Marty Moore always was, and always will be the real powerhouse behind FreshFix. A fantastic photographer and vlogger in his own right, Marty has become a dab hand at the online Sim Racing and has developed a number of guides on the subject through the really enjoyable Garage Life series.

As for myself, well I don’t really have anything planned. I’ll continue to photograph racing cars through the CianDon platform, and will have occasional articles appear on other sites, but as of now I have no regular outlet lined up for the new year. For the time we have left though, it’s time to celebrate the great time we’ve had over the past two years and I’d like to thank each and every one of you for the support.

Cian Donnellan.

Another Year another VAGE.ie Car Show 2018

Another Year another VAGE.ie Car Show 2018

As sure as the River Lee running through Cork City, summer to the motoring enthusiast means the annual Volkswagen Audi Group Enthusiasts Show and Shine in Fermoy Co. Cork. In the interests of full disclosure I have to admit to having an inside track on this subject, as I made a small contribution to the organizing this year.

2018 brings about the 16th edition of the VAGE Show and Shine from the Corrin Events centre.

Over the years there’s been a change in the venue from time to time, but no change in substance. The show has always maintained it’s laid-back vibe and atmosphere. Make no mistake, that approach is by design and not accident, the club will tell you the show is as much a chance for them to meet up with good friends from around the country as it is for guys and gals attending.

 

As with any outdoor event, the show is always dependent on the weather to play ball, and in one of the driest summers in years, surely there was no cause for concern…well maybe a little! In nearly a carbon copy of the 2017 show, the day started out overcast and drizzly, but as lunchtime approached the weather final started to co-operate. Summer was once again alive at the VAGE show.

That said the early morning weather didn’t deter car enthusiasts the land over. A steady stream made their way to the grounds throughout the morning and into the early afternoon. Strong attendance from clubs like Autostadt, MLVW, GTINI and DB Dailys really added to the atmosphere. Show sponsors George Dalton Revo and D&D Detailing Gtechniq also put on a fantastic display of high quality motors.

 

In recent years the show has open up to become an all German show, why should the VAG gang have all the fun they thought? It turned out to be an inspired decision as the quality of BMW, Opel and Mercedes on display was phenomenal. It just goes to show that you don’t know what little gems are tucked away through out the land.

Case in point was the beautiful 1979 Mk1 Opel Kadett that picked up the runner up car in show award. Talking to the owner after picking up their prize, I found out that it was only the cars 2nd spin in 12 months. The weather had cleared enough for them to make the spin down and it paid dividends!

Winner of the best in show was the beautiful little mk1 VW Derby coupe. A fantastic car and a credit to its owner. It’s reassuring to know that these great cars are still knocking around the place and long may it last! Owning motors like these must be closer to a vocation than a hobby such is the level of detail and love gone into them. I’d hate to be trying to find parts for them!

So another year down for the VAGE show, and the future looks bright. Like the economy there seems to be a real bounce in the car scene in Ireland lately, long may it last.

 

Here’s to VAGE 2019, we hear the weather is going to great!

Euro -Trip Part I: A Date With The ‘Ring!

Euro -Trip Part I: A Date With The ‘Ring!

Holiday, a natural time to relax, unwind and recharge the body. Early June, with two full weeks booked off work, would be absolutely ideal for catching up on sleep, chilling out and enjoying a few cold beverages in the sunshine. It’s natural, but our man Cian doesn’t conform to normality. The following is an excerpt from the EuroTrip travel blog of a an absolute automotive nutter, and that’s in his own words!

It’s the usual scenario in the modern world. Minding your own business of a Friday night, when the phone buzzes with yet another Social Media notification. Ughhhh. Rationale says to ignore it, as it’s not going to be any more than a thirty second attention grabber, but the urge remains to click in for a look regardless, god forbid you miss something that will be all the chat later. What I didn’t expect though was that a simple Facebook tag would lead directly to me standing on the infield of an iconic Grand Prix circuit watching a stream of Classic Race cars charging towards me through the viewfinder of my camera.

To have such an impact, it would be fair to expect the FB video in question to be truly seismic. Well, it wasn’t, in any way. An in-conspicuous, poorly shot mobile phone clip of a string of cars passing through a tunnel on a support road somewhere on the Hockenheim complex, it wasn’t anything special.

My head though, like many fellow petrolheads, works in an odd way in situations like this. When the buddy clicked @Cian beneath the video, he had no idea that a WhatsApp message would land into the chat roughly 10 minutes later informing all that I was booked to go to Germany. It makes sense to me, in a way, that seeing a video was posted by a Tourenwagen Classics would lead me right away into a spiral of googling the series, checking out the 2018 dates, sussing that a round would take place in the Nürburgring and immediately figuring out the bargain flights available from Ryanair!

My fascination with 1990’s, especially early 90’s, DTM and touring cars stems directly from the incredible ‘DTM Golden Years’ video that is floating around the internet. About six minutes long, its just a succession of E30’s, 190E’s and Sierra Cosworth’s flying, sliding and curb hopping around German racetracks, accompanied by the most period correct German Eurobeat. To get a chance to see these machines up close was just irresistible.

Bags packed and away, my destination was an event called the Nürburgring Classic, a rather new occasion with this being only it’s second year. The main focus of the event was on ‘Young timer’ racing, or essentially cars from the 80’s and 90’s which suited me just fine. That’s not to say things were exclusive though, as the event carried one of the most diverse race schedules I’ve ever experienced.

The biggest group on track at any time was a swarm of nearly 100 Pre-war cars of all shapes and sizes. While not racing, it was clear to see that some were pushing a lot harder than others. While my knowledge of cars here was criminally terrible, the sight of an iconic blue Bugatti Type 35 complete with driver lean for maximum cornering was very cool to see.

Hot on their heals was a group of Can Am racers, reliving the lunacy that was the Canadian American racing series in the early 1970’s. Booming V8, some tipping close to nine Litres, howled around the GP track. The names like Lola may now seem confined to the past, but the sole McLaren entry acted as a reminder of the depth of history attached to so many automotive brands we still see today.

Being Germany, it was no surprise in the slightest that some of Stuttgart’s finest would be on display, a testament to the rich and storied success Porsche has enjoyed on track over its past 70 years. Walking out of the media centre, still in awe from my first experience of such a facility, the very first car I laid eyes on was the exposed nose of a Porsche 917 in a pit opening. Stunning doesn’t even come close. The fact that that right next door sat a pair of immaculate 356’s and in the awning behind a Kremer 935 K3, it truly was a special place for Porsche fans.

Out on track, the Porsches were putting on a show, although truth be told I neither cared nor have any knowledge of who won, lost, ran great times or hit issue. This isn’t what the event was about. It was an opportunity to act like a complete fanboy watching a BMW M1 chase down a Porsche 935 through the Schumacher S.

And, in reality, I really was there as a fan. I may have had media credentials, but I made all the rookie mistakes typical of someone overly excited to take in a track and an experience so absolutely incredible to me. I clocked over 25km walking in the heat around the infield without knowing there were scooters and shuttles laid on, I walked clean past Klaus Ludwig as I heard an RS2000 Ford Escort being revved in the distance and I pretty much missed all the Saturday evening racing as I took a notion and drove the Nordschleife in the rental, 1L Skoda.

Come Sunday, there was two things I knew I had to see, first off, the actual Tourenwagen Classics race. Standing on the outside of turn one, it was just like a herd thundering down that dipped straight. BMW, Mercedes, Alfa, Renault, Ford, Audi & Opel all fighting for space on the wide track. The noise, all naturally aspirated bar the Sierra, was just seismic. At the front, the mid-90’s V6 cars, mainly the Alfa 155 and a brace of Mercedes, howled off into the distance to do their own dicing.

Behind them though, it was, as a race fan, truly special. Curb hopping E30’s leading 190E Cosworth, the Super touring Vectra dicing with the Laguna of a similar era and a flame spitting, Cigarette sponsored rowdy Ford Sierra just making me howl like a child every time it passed in yet another whoosh of turbo noise.

While this was truly epic, I had one final box to tick on my short trip to Germany. While the GP track is an incredible facility, it will always struggle of being in the shadow of its big, bad Nordschleife brother. Its colossal in the car world, but in the region the track seems to dominate all facets of life such is the way it winds through towns, over roads and seems to provide vast employment to a rather quiet region. Of all the spots on this giant stretch of tarmac, I just had to get to the Outside of Karussell, even if it did involve me getting quite lost in the woods for over an hour.

I’d read, before leaving on the trip, some of the old Speedhunters coverage of the N24 and the experience of being at this spot, but its truly magical and intriguing. You don’t expect the steep run up on approach, although I had an idea from having to downshift the previous day while driving the track! The other thing that grabs you is the sheer noise of cars bouncing across the concrete bowl of this iconic corner.

As a finale to the Nürburgring Classic, the 3-Hour Eifelrennen would see the most diverse list of entries ever experienced take on the complete 24-Hour track layout, combining Nordschleife with the GP track. I presume there were classes, but such was the relentless stream of cars it was difficult to know what was going on. What was obvious though, was at the head of the field sat a quartet of incredibly quick Porsches, the widebody, big power machine cutting through traffic with consummate ease before dropping down into the tumble drier that is the experience of driving Karussell.

So, sunburnt to a crisp, drained and head frazzled, arms in pain from dragging around camera gear and feet worn out, I just perched myself upon a barrier and took in the madness that was the passing mass of cars. Impulsive as it so was, I could think of no better way to pass a weekend. I’m home barely two days and Im packing up again to head to Belgium to a rally. There was no spur of the moment reactions to Social Media posts here, just a guy handed me a leaflet at a car show and I promised him I’d go. I have no option really……..

Happy 50th Mondello!

Happy 50th Mondello!

Mondello Park is, to anyone involved with cars or motorsport, a cherished addition to this country. Our sole proper Race Track, Mondello has evolved to always remain relevant, no matter the ever changing environment that is track-based racing. From humble beginnings to hosting large scale International events, the Kildare venue has delivered time and time again, yet still remained as open as possible to all strains of the motoring world. Manufactures use the venue to entertain guests or launch new vehicles, Drift schools use the large paddock spaces to train the next generation of driving talent while events like TrackDays.ie allow joe soaps like me to be pretend race drivers for a day. With Mondello Park celebrating its 50th Birthday this week, it was only fitting that a celebration was in order.

 

It has been no secret that the cost of all motorsport activity is growing with every year that passes, almost heading unthinkably towards a point of extinction, and as such a large push has been made from within to help protect the sports that we cherish. In the face of higher insurance levies, entry fees and other costs, the Irish Motorsport Support Fund came to be. Steered by a core of enthusiasts with experience of all manner of Motorsport activities, the aim is to provide financial relief to ultimately reduce costs falling on the competitor, as such a case of Motorsport giving back and supporting its own future.

The IMSF knew that to do things correctly, it was going to take a sizeable event to boost their profile and raise money for the fund. With the coincidental anniversary of Mondello Park’s opening, it made sense to create the Mondello50, a true celebration of all things motorsport related in this country. Bringing together strands of the sporting world that are likely to never meet was a novel touch, and a huge boost to the events appeal.

While many of the Motorsports present may seem diverse and at times un-connected, the common bond that tied many together was Mondello itself. Thinking through the disciplines on display, it made sense to celebrate the track through displays of all facets of the Irish car-based sporting world. The Hillclimb guys may seem at home racing up and down steep stretches of tarmac, but multiple rounds of the Naylor Engineering Irish Hillclimb & Sprint Championship take place on the hallowed Mondello track. The Navigation and Endurance Trial cars may seem at home on filthy lanes in the middle of the night, but countless events utilise the sprawling grounds of the Caragh venue for tests. The same for Autotesting, with rounds often happening in the large paddock even while other series use the circuit around them. Rallying has a storied history with Mondello, with it often hosting a spectator stage as part of the marathon Circuit of Ireland as well as countless modern Sprint events, while its wilder Rallycross offspring has made Mondello is home. Then there are the Drifters.

When Drifting landed into Ireland in the early 00’s, it found a home in Rosegreen. The Tipperary Stockcar oval was special, but ultimately through a combination of ownership changes and the boom in the sport had to move beyond its roots. Mondello welcomed drifting in with scepticism, yet all these years later the pair are almost inseparable. The Irish Drift Championship now have their offices based on site, while their events draw crowds reminiscent of the popularity of the Circuit of Ireland in the 80’s. As a celebration of Mondello, it was natural that Drifting would be represented, but what I had completely lost sight of was the fact that although the sport has flourished here for 15+ years, many of those in attendance with be witnessing the spectacle live for the very first time.

What caught my eye almost immediately in the paddock was the awning of Stone Motorsport, and the pair of vehicles sitting underneath. I’d seen the ‘Drift Taxi’ before, both at Drift, Hillclimb and on a visit to the incredible Stone facility last year, but it still commands so much attention. The three passenger bucket seats were certainly getting plenty of use over the weekend. What I really wanted to see though was the prosperously low Nissan Silvia S15 sat next to it. A newly completed build for the 2018 season, Stones have thrown every ounce of knowledge and skills into creating what they believe to be the ultimate chassis for both Drifting & Hillclimbing. With the front clip removed, the Honda K24 sits proudly as an act of defiance to the conventional wisdom of RB’s and 2J’s ruling the world. The chassis work, which I find incredibly reminiscent of a Pro Mod drag car, is absolutely impeccable as you would expect from a vehicle designed as the company’s essential demo-car. While the Aristo was getting plenty of regular runs, the Silvia only appeared in fleeting bursts.

As the drifting guys put on a show in front of a new audience, the main track section or Live Arena was split equally time wise between those and the Rally Cars. The nature of the event leant itself to having Rally as the largest spectacle in the eyes of many present, and a constant succession of differing cars and styles of driving rally helped to give a flavour of the world we spend weekends trudging through fields and ditches to watch. Long queues formed all day to take advantage of passenger spins available. There was representation of all facets of style and era on show, from early-60’s BMC Mini Cooper S’s through to often sideways MK2 Escorts and modern Group N machinery.

Sprinkled among the cars present were a number of very rare and valuable machines. The legendary Group B era is often considered as the pinnacle of Rallying due to speed, danger & drama that period evoked in the eyes of the public, and those days was relived with none other than a Lancia 037, an Audi Quattro and a Rover Metro 6R4 screaming around the confines of Mondello’s opening corners, each passing in wails of utterly magnificent and distinctive exhaust notes.

Amongst the machinery being thrown about, I naturally had personal favourites, which is blatantly obvious from the sheer number of photo’s I have of two particular cars. Both are a reflection of the owner’s connection with rallying, owned and built in homage to a certain period that provided the inspiration. Both are also the complete anthesis of each other!! On one side of the preverbal fence, Donagh Kelly (recent winner of the West Cork Rally for a 5th time) was really out to play. He owns the Metro 6R4, which was being driven by somebody else that we’ll get to in a bit, but it was his other ‘toy that just does it for me. An Opel Ascona Coupe is a special car right from the off, and in rallying 400 form, utterly beautiful. In a sea of Escort domination in the early-80’s, the Ascona was a proper fighter.

At the hands of Walter Rohrl is became a World Champion, but in Ireland it gained admiration at the hands of Jimmy Mcrae, Bertie Fisher, Austin McHale and even Henri Toivinen. This particular car has a more local connection for Donagh though, for this is the very car that Donegal hero James Cullen wrestled around some of the country’s most famous stages. The livery is a tribute to Cullen’s 1988 attempt on the Donegal International, an event the car would finish runner up on. Thirty years later though, it felt like a grainy RPM video playing out in front of my eyes. As was plain to see, this car may look like a museum piece, but it sure ain’t treated like one.

While all out, sideways everywhere machinery dominated the domestic scene in the 1980’s, the following decade saw all this change. As technology moved on and cars became more expensive, it was becoming harder for young drivers to make a name in the sport. The days of buying an affordable Ascona or Escort and hoping to win an event were ended by the new breed of Group A cars. These monsters were incredible to watch and spawned countless Homologation special road cars, but they were beyond the reaches of most. There was a need to develop a support category to get youngsters onto a path towards success, and a boom in small front-wheel-drive hot hatches seemed the natural place to begin. Super 1600 was born.

An S1600 car is one serious piece of kit, have no doubt about that. High power, high revving screamers were the default order of business, all designed to be surrounded by all the best of technology available at the time. An arms race soon kicked off with countless manufactures getting involved, but it was the French who were the class leaders. While the Clio was impressive, it was the Citroen Saxo S1600 which proved its dominance from the start. This particular Saxo had a hard life, going from a works car campaigned in 2001/2 to being found badly damaged in a Northern Irish barn, until it fell into the hands of David Hunt. Anyone that has followed the build online over the last 2 years will attest to the sheer level of detail afforded in its restoration. To hear the little Citroen absolutely howling at berserk revs is a wonderful experience, although trackside I probably could have done with ear protection.

All around, various disciplines put on a show. Out on the international loop, a pack of Rallycross cars scrabbled for grip thanks to their rather compromised set up on Tarmac, while Auto Cross Semog buggies chased each other around while sounding like a pack of 90’s Formula 1 cars.

In the in-field sections between the National and International loop’s, Off Road Trial were taking place. An obvious stepdown in pace from all the frantic action happening all around, the skill required to get these rather specialised vehicles into some of the spot I saw to some incredible control.

Alas though, all good party’s need a star performer to really put on a show, and the IMSF had a treat lined up for good old Mondello. Craig Breen is at the absolute pinnacle of World Rallying right now, competing in the WRC with the factory Citroen team. The Waterford man has had an incredibly difficult path to the top, but it seems that his pure passion for rallying was the driving force at times. Craig’s enthusiasm for the sport is infectious, and he is never afraid to profess his Irish motorsports roots. Pushed recently during a WRC interview on a favourite Car and Rally pairing, the answer was pure Craig. “A Metro 6R4, every day of the week. No Question. Where would I bring it? To the Hills. Donegal International Rally”. Well, the weather did feel like mid-June, and there was a Metro sitting in the Mondello paddock……

After soo casually mingling around the paddock all morning, and yes there are photos of him checking out the Saxo, it was time for a warm up for Craig. Strapped into the Ford Escort he went viral with last year (2nd overall on the Ravens Rock Rally with friend Patrick Croke ‘co-driving’ without notes), Craig went out and put some of the drift cars to shames, sliding the Ford around with consummate ease, both back wheels billowing smoke in a fashion definitely not seen on a timed rally stage.

Few runs done, it was time to strap into the fearsome Rover. I stood at the start line less than a few feet from the stack of 6 vertical trumpets atop the engine block. The launch was gingerly made, and I felt somewhat disappointed, but the next sight I had was a 30-year-old monster sliding under braking, right on the limit. Many of the relics of that glorious period are now cherished and very valuable collector vehicles, so to see a Group B monster being driven by the scruff of the neck by one of the Worlds best drivers is a real privilege.

Mondello Park, as well as the motorsports that use the venue, have changed massively over the past 50 years. It’s important to step back at times and celebrate what we have available on our shores, and the IMSF are determined to do their best to ensure we can have plenty more celebrations in the future!

The Lakes of Killarney

The Lakes of Killarney

There’s a distinct beauty to the first real blast of sunshine for the year, the initial feeling that perhaps we may actually get a Summer in Ireland for a change. As the evening drags on basked in glorious shades, people seem happy. Strangers make conversation about the weather, not remarking as normal on a bleak dreary Irish day but rather commenting ‘God its fierce nice isn’t it’. Natural pessimism remained with the typical retort often being ‘I hope it lasts for the weekend’, but you could twig you were in the right company when another would chip in with ‘It’ll be fierce hard on Tyres”. See, as the glorious sunshine beams down, I find myself of a Friday evening stood in the stable yard of Killarney Racecourse. All around, the stunning natural vistas of mountain peaks stand draped in a yellow glow, but it’s horsepower of an altogether more exciting kind that has drawn me here, and the ever-wonderful Rally of The Lakes.

I’ve gushed before about the beauty of Killarney, and truth be told it feels as if the town was hand built to cater for all manner of guests. Being the May Bank Holiday Weekend, throngs of large busses ferry the masses of Tourists around the sights. Everything seems to be within reach for guests, such is the amount of spots you encounter coaches frantically looking for parking to offload their party of overseas visitors. The sunshine naturally helps, as the town radiates in the fine weather. Ice-cream shops become licenses to print money, while the doors of Pubs are thrown open and customers spill out into outdoor seating. Added to this is the influx of the rally brigade, making a 25th pilgrimage to Kerry for the May weekend. While the wonderful Historic Rally in December may be an incredibly popular event, it is dwarfed significantly by the size and scale of the crowds drawn to the Lakes each year.

A rally weekend generally begins for me on the day of the event, although more and more so I’m finding time to get down the day before to take in the build-up and excitement before the crew’s head for Stage 1. For Killarney though, preparation started much earlier. Like last year, I became quite aware of how little knowledge I had of the stages that are staples of the Lakes experience. While 2017 saw me make a first visit to the Tim Healy Pass, I’d heard soo much gushing that I knew it was finally time to check out the true Beara stages, Cod’s Head and Ardgroom. A fortnight before the event I went for a spin and fell in love with a part of Ireland I had never been before. I’ll come back to it in a while, but my god Beara is incredible.

Scrutiny before an event is a great way to get both up close and truly under the skin of a lot of the rally machinery. In a change from previous year, this took place in Killarney Racecourse which was ideal. Not only for the amount of space available for crews to unload cars, but the sheer beauty of the backdrop that adorns the Racecourse. The peaks of the National Park stretch as far as the horizon, and with a genuine warmth in the air its magical. It was sunny here as well for the Historic scrutiny but being early December, it was decidedly colder!!

The cars filter through somewhat at random, home built challengers side-by-side with the latest and greatest Factory built machines. The Eves brothers Kevin and Corey had their pair of AE86 Corollas in line together. Corey’s car, with the rather appropriate 86 door number, is typical of a competitive level car within a class, with the main aim for the weekend being to beat similarly powered machinery. Under the bonnet lay a surprise, as the silver rocker cover deceptively hid the fact that a Honda B16 engine powers this Corolla, with the Vtec lump reverse engineered to cater for the RWD setup. In front though, Kevin’s car is on a completely different level to his brothers. Powered by a 2.5L Millington Diamond engine, this machine is built to win! Kevin is the reigning Irish Modified Champion, a series designed for rally cars that perhaps fall out of the original Manufacture homologation specs, so the home for all the wild side of Irish Rallying. It wouldn’t be a great weekend for the Eves’ though, as both would retire on the first day.

Once through scrutiny, the next big task for many of the crews was to put on a show for the masses in Killarney Town Centre. While you may see elsewhere in the world that events put on vastly expensive Super Special Stages that draw the crowds, in Ireland we simply appreciate the opportunity to get up close to the drivers and cars. Scrutiny and the subsequent Pairc Ferme are generally off-limits to the Public, so a Ceremonial Launch is of the best way to make a rally feel a part of the community. No matter which event you go to though, you would struggle to find a bigger crowd at any start ramp than in the Kingdom. The locals flood out onto the narrow streets to welcome their hero’s, with plenty of local crews taking the chance to cross the ramp in front of family and friends. It’s not every day that a bunch of rally cars are able to take over a busy shopping street on a Friday evening, and it was clear to see how well the invasion was received.

As the crowds soaked up the sight of the cars ticking over in the sunshine, a rather noisy burble grew from the back of the pack. Casting my eye down, it was pretty obvious that this was no Honda Civic or Ford Escort, but something a lot more special. The closer I got, the more potent the noise. Peeking through the crowds, a familiar blue quarter panel appeared into view. Amongst the buildings, an echo grew as Kevin O’Donoghue’s BMW E30 snaked through the bemused onlookers. It’s truly incredible to experience the noise this car makes, thank in the most part to the engine that lies under the bonnet. Developed from a Saab unit, Motor Design Sweden have pieced together one of the wildest sounding N/A Four Cylinder I’ve come across, with three litres of capacity designed to tackle rally stages. Kevin continued through the line until he reached the Escort of son Colin, who would be taking on the Junior rally the following day. It’s one thing seeing a Father and Son crew compete alongside one-another, but more impressive as they both crossed the line to start the rally in special machinery.

Before any car was to cross the ramp though, a poignant gesture was made to remember the late Dougie Hughes. For over 40 years, Dougie would have been the voice of many start and finish ramp ceremonies, an MC who lived and breathed Rallying in Ireland. When news broke of Dougies passing, he was remembered fondly by the rally family all over the world, and his friends in Killarney & District Motor Club honoured the man with the release of doves into the night sky.

As the evening began to fade, I left the ramp and parked up for a look at the various cars cruising around the town for the weekend. We don’t have large fluid motoring lifestyle events like Worthersee or large cruises in this country, so a Rally Weekend in Killarney or Letterkenny is as close as we get. People make a point of heading down south not only to show off their own car, but to meet others doing the exact same thing and to take in the atmosphere. While the argument will be raised about how few of these people travel with even the slightest interest in the Rally or simply to cause trouble, the vast majority I talked to, many faces you seem to only meet at the Lakes, seemed to have made the spin to enjoy a weekend with other petrol heads. Although the town did at times feel littered with scrappy Lexus IS200’s, many with a straight pipe exhaust that would pierce solid rock and a CB aerial large enough to contact NASA, there were plenty of gems amongst them.

Of all the car’s around town though, I still think I caught the absolute pinnacle on Friday evening. Sat on a garage forecourt watching the sun set, an unfamiliar shape drove past. My eyes felt deceived, but when the car pulled in past me a minute later, I knew I had to take a closer look. Shimmering in its silver glory, this 1975 Toyota Celica TA22 is a rare machine anywhere in the world, but to find one in Ireland is exceptionally rare. A new arrival to these shores, imported less than 2 months ago, this car hasn’t arrived like soo many others from Japan but rather the sunnier climes of Australia. The car had been bought and restored by the owner in Oz, and when the time came to arrive home, it was natural he says that the Celica would be put into a shipping crate destined for the other side of the world. Opening the sweeping bonnet revealed a Carb’d 1.6L 2T engine, finished to an incredible standard that matched the level of the car. Inside, it truly is exactly like stepping back into 1975 with brown vinyl covering every surface, bar the addition of a newer steering wheel and radio, as although it didn’t look like it, this Toyota was doubling as the family car for the night. As the sun set, I grabbed a few pictures pretty much right where I met the car, in the back of a petrol station. Into darkness I had to go, and the sat-nav was set for that magical Beara peninsula.

Lying what feels like about one million miles from anywhere, Beara juts out into the Atlantic while straddling the Cork/Kerry border. Stunningly beautiful, it’s a place that remains unspoiled from how nature intended. Nearly two hours from Killarney, the road to Allihies is long and twisty, the majority of the mileage clocked up in complete darkness devoid of anyone else on the roads. I’d said to a friend that I’d found a great Air BnB right on the stages, but little did they know that my thought of luxury accommodation would be a duvet in my spacious Peugeot 207. Travelling this way guarantees the best spots on some the most in-accessible locations that stages pass through and has the added benefit of tuning out of my usually hectic world for a few nights, coupled with some stunning vistas to wake up to. On a cold Saturday morning on Irelands southern-most tip, fog rolled in off the sea, rain covered the now-slick tarmac, but excitement built in the air.

By 11am we were go, the first crackle of a Ford Fiesta R5 bouncing off the sea cliffs and drowning out the crashing waves. First on the road would be Sam Moffett, last year’s winner, who was aiming to guide his Combilift liveried Fiesta to even more success in 2018. After claiming a clean sweep of Championship wins last year, his fiercest competition this year has appeared in the form of brother Josh in an identical Ford. The surprise by the time the cars reached Cods Head, having completed the iconic duo of Molls Gap and Healy Pass, was that both Moffetts appeared to be off the pace, which was being utterly dominated by Robert Barrable in yet another M-Sport R5 challenger. Fighting for tenths was par for the course for the brothers Moffett, but Barrable has started at a pace that saw him lead by nearly 25 seconds at the end of Day 1.

The other big story that grew as times appeared online was the speed of Rob Duggan in the MK2 Escort. A former British Junior Champion and Billy Coleman Award winner, Duggan is an incredible driving talent. While his JWRC dreams may have faded for now, Rob has made a huge push to get back enjoying the sport. He reminded us all of his talent with a dominant win at the Killarney Historic Rally, but starting in the rain surrounded by cutting edge 4wd cars would surely show up the Killarney man? Hah! Third fastest OVERALL up Molls Gap was a sure signal of intent, and it was clear by the pace the red Escort skirted along the Beara coastline that we had a man on a charge before our eyes.

Rob wasn’t gonna have it all his way though, as a strong field of quick Escorts lined up for a crack off the local ace. Kiernan, Brogan and Collins and showed pace, but ultimately couldn’t live with the speed of Duggans rental car, although there were some hairy moments along the way. That was except for Barry Meade though. After an absence of a few years, Meade has made a welcome return to the stages as of late. As Duggan hit trouble with the Ford’s Gearbox, Meade pushed to grab any advantage available. Come the end of Day 1, a tenth of a second would separate the pair. You couldn’t even get an expletive out in that time!

While the trip south is a staple of the Lakes route, it was a real treat for the crews in the Junior Rally who got a rare opportunity to tackle the Saturday stages. While the main field entry may have appeared somewhat slack, the Juniors really done their part in adding to the event. Twenty-Four cars took the start, and the pace amongst the leading crews was truly electric. Visibly quicker than large swathes of the main field competitors who had passed through before, the sight of a Honda Civic being fearlessly ragged along a bumpy stretch of coastal tarmac is incredible to experience. Setting the pace from start was Jason Black in the Toyota Starlet, although Colin O’Donoghue was keeping the Starlet honest in his Ford Escort. Heading towards the last loop, Black flew past me at a serious pace, but unfortunately less than 400m down the road his event would end with a meeting with a wall caused by a snapped steering arm. After pushing hard all day, Colin O’Donoghue romped home to a popular local victory.

With the early morning gloom now most certainly replaced with afternoon sunshine and warmth, it was back into Killarney. While the town can be swarmed by a less than desirable crowd at times during the weekend, and soooo many Lexus IS200’s, its always nice to know where the better cars are hanging out. One of those spots is the AE86IRL meet that happens every year. It’s a chance to catch up with friendly faces, talk shite and look at some sweet Corolla’s. While numbers are slowly falling each passing year, the level that these little cars are kept in is always mind-blowing. For many, myself included, a Corolla GT Coupe is as much a part of the rally weekend scenery as anything else, and I still feel excited watching a clean ‘Cam pass by.

While the traditional ‘UK Spec’ style is still popular, we’re definitely seeing a growing presence of JDM style cars built to emulate the timeless early-00’s JDM look. A few other cars joined this rather select and quiet meet, including this incredibly sweet Nissan Silvia S14A, sitting perfectly on a set of Enkei wheels. Unlike most, this S-Body is not built to go sideways, instead it’s intended track purpose is to take on the Nürburgring, which it has on a few occasions. Sun setting, it was time to make shapes once again.

I’ve talked at length before about Ballaghbeama Gap, and how magical a stretch of tarmac it is. To watch a rally car almost slalom down the descent as the exhaust note reverberates off the valley walls is truly special. Ballaghbeama is also truly one of the most remote stages in Ireland, with access limited to a handful of small tight lay-by’s. One such gap between a waterfall and the road would provide accommodation for the night. Bunked down for the evening, with the panoramic sun-roof opened looking into a sky full of stars, this felt like the purest way of all to follow such an exciting event. Come morning, it was go time, and a 00-car pairing of an RS Porsche and a screaming F2 Almeira kit car was perfect recipe to shake off the cobwebs.

One of the quickest cars to pass, it seemed, was the oh so delightful Talbot Sunbeam of Owen Murphy. The multiple Forestry champion has a well-known history of some giant killing results on Tarmac in Evo’s and Skoda’s, but he has now built what he believes to be the ultimate Historic car to stick it to the Ford Escort dominance. Stick it to them he did, as after the end of two days Murphy would take victory by over seven minutes from his nearest rival.

The National battle that promised soo much on Saturday night just never really ignited on Sunday. Meade ran into problems early on, while many others decided to simply get to the finish. Gary Kiernan made a push over the closing stages, but the gap would prove just too much for the West Cork national winner, seeing Duggan cruise home with 45 seconds to spare. With victory’s for Colin O’Donoghue and Rob Duggan, Killarney had plenty of local success to celebrate in the May sunshine.

Alas though, there must be a man to take home the trophy at the end of the day. Robert Barrable gave his Fiesta R5 an almighty push, and took maximum ITRC points, but simply ran out of legs on the Sunday stages. Starting the day with a 25 second deficit, it was Manus Kelly who truly had the bit between his teeth. The Donegal man has made a habit of winning in the S12 Impreza WRC of late, and he had every intention of making the most of a rare trip South. Manus said on Friday that the weather ‘Felt like June’, a nod to his ultimate goal, and come Sunday evening the champagne must too have tasted like June, when Kelly aims for a third straight Donegal win.

As the Lakes came to an exciting close on Sunday afternoon, I was nearly already home. Three long days of traipsing through rivers and down banks, over ditches and past sheep is hard going, never mind the added hardship of living out of a French hatchback. But for the sheer excitement of the event, getting right into the action and living the buzz, there truly is no better way to follow a rally!!

Rebuilding The Mazda Rx7 – The Garage Life

Rebuilding The Mazda Rx7 – The Garage Life

[embedyt] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9AjHedXBkc[/embedyt]

Like all things garage related things dont go to plan. In this video the team remove the engine gearbox and diff from the Mazda Rx7.

The engine is going for a rebuild after 3 years of racing.

The gearbox…well stay tuned

The diff is just going back to a standard Mazda diff to suit the ratios of the new gearbox.

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