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My outlook, in an automotive sense, was to always push the envelope in terms of the events I get to, the experiences I encounter, the people I meet, the craftsmanship I witness and the enjoyment I get at the end. My calendar is like a military operation at times, planned to the nth degree so I can get the most out of whatever event I have pencilled in. Wherever I end up, I know it is by choice that Ive made the sometimes long or expensive journey to get there. Over the past year, thanks to this site, I’ve been able to chronicle my adventures, often accompanied by a rambling, deluded opinion piece, and bring to life the variety of events I get to. I always want to see more, have new experiences and gain more knowledge, but then some events, I just enjoy for just being themselves and not being unfamiliar to me. Ultimate Drift was definitely one of those!

I’ve talked at length before about my history with drifting, with my opinions gaining a rather split reception. Looking back, I saw drifting evolve from a grass roots sport to a global cultural icon, yet I couldn’t let go of the small-time nature that got me hooked. Over time, I fell out of love with the sport on a number of levels. I still maintained interest in the competition side of things, but I stopped attending events in the flesh.

That being said, we never had a steady stream of events to attend anyway. In the early days, D-Rift and Prodrift held proper competitive events in Watergrasshill and later in Fermoy, but then word spread that the noisy, sliding cars were no longer welcome in WGH. This wasn’t long after the closure of Rosegreen, so us down South were really left abandoned. Mondello naturally filled the void, and still does to a large extent, but it is still the bones of a three hour journey each way for me at least, meaning there wasn’t the same buzz to get to events.

Over the years, many attempts were made to get regular drifting back to Cork. Superdrift and Driftfest both tried, but in the midst of the Recession, the appetite and desire to make a success of either format just wasn’t there really, and so they slid into the history books in time. This was where Ultimate Drift fits into the picture, as finally we got a proper push to bring regular Drifting back down South.

Spearheaded by Darren Hickey, the series had a smart, passionate and determined person there to properly steer the ship forward. Co-Owner of the very successful D&D Detailing, Darren brought professional idea’s which have become a hallmark of modern drifting, and perhaps explain the shortcomings of so many other Drift ventures before. Suddenly, what was an open track day had sponsorship, branded vehicles, professional signage, a large online presence, live music and a big-event atmosphere. People turned up to enjoy themselves watching as much as drivers enjoyed testing themselves around what I still believe to be Irelands best Drift venue.

Darren will happily telly you that it was a team effort, and it most definitely was, but everyone involved was there for the love of the sport, not to win FB likes or make a fortune. The events were fun, small games were added long before anyone had heard of Drift Games and drivers continued to rather visibly improve, with definitely a few I can think of who started as UD Novices that now hold IADC or IDC competition licenses. Competition elements were tried, with a mini-series taking place last year, as well as novel approaches to drift events sampled with the floodlit Drift Nights becoming a regular fixture.

On a personal level, Ultimate Drift helped me fall back in love with Drifting. Grass roots, beat up cars is what got me into the sport, and in the world of sideways Drag-Cars, this felt old-school. The visuals may not be appealing to everyone, but each ripple and dent was a sign of someone pushing limits, learning the skills and trying out things in an environment that encouraged those very things. I was still very new to taking photos of cars when I took a mad notion to apply for media access to an event, but getting up close and personal was on a level I had never imagined all those years standing on the bank. I was able to try out techniques that I couldn’t possibly practice elsewhere and learn new skills. I met soo many people, enjoyed great laughs and had some heart in the mouth moments on track yet was able to witness so many personal high’s, from the wry smile of nailing a corner, through to some finally hitting the track in their dream build. I had the honour of providing the poster imagery to a number of events and this was something I never thought possible.

After 3 years of not only running but driving in Ultimate Drift, last weekends event is to be the last. A rumour had been in the air that the news was imminent, and a post on Darren’s Facebook spelled the end. Of all the ways to go, having a full entry of car’s, a beautiful Winter’s day and the surprise appearance of none other than James Deane is not too shabby at all, and entirely fitting of a series that was so well run from the start. A void has now emerged in Irish drifting again, that leaves many question of what happens now. Grass roots drifting will continue at tracks like Tynagh, but down South we are left with nothing. A new track is in development in Cobh that has the potential to be a strong asset to the area, but it’s going to need strong support to get off the ground. From a driver stand point, the demise of Ultimate Drift also spells the end of potential entry-level competitive drifting, with the only series now offering this are IADC and IDC, which many may believe is too high of a step up to be of interest. Whatever comes along in 2018 though, we have to be thankful for what we had and the memories made. From ourselves here in Freshfix, and I’m sure countless others, we’d like to say a massive thanks to the whole Ultimate Drift crew for the work done over the last few years. Thank you for the wonderful events, the wonderful atmosphere and the craic. Thank You.

Darren Hickey’s post on the end of Ultimate Drift:

“If you’re going to finish something, finish it on a high” And what a high Drift Nights was. Going in to this event, I knew it was going to be the last event I would be being running this year. We gave it our all (even managed to get the two S14’s ready) and the results were unreal. A full grid of drivers all looking to enjoy an evening season in the dark, highlighted by the man himself James Deane putting on a master class and smoking the place out. Everyone had the same goal, finish off the year in style and have fun with our friends. After three years of running the Ultimate Drift Series, Drift Nights was the last event as we know it. Due to other business and family commitments I have made the decision to step back from running drift event’s full time. Next year my aim is to enjoy the sport for what it is from the driver’s seat. I ran the Ultimate Drift Series as a driver and always kept that in mind when making decisions on how we ran each event, always keeping in mind would I enjoy driving that track, is it a new challenge.

From my past experience of running drift events I know that what can go wrong, will go wrong. All you can do is make sure you have the equipment to sort any issues that might arise. True luck comes in to place with the one variable that every event organizer has no control over, the WEATHER. Out of 30 events we only had one washout, seems the weather man was looking out for us.

To the UD Team: The Ultimate Drift Series was never a one man show, it was a team of great people, and for that I count myself lucky enough to have been able to call on my friends & family to make sure each event was the best it could be. I would like to give the biggest thanks to the whole UD team both past and present and to all those that helped UD grow over the years.

 

Signing off Darren H (see ye in the pit lane next year lads)